Poulain Family

originating from Luneray, Seine-Maritime, France

The direct line to Fred Shade is
(1) Isaac Poulain and Esther Ouvrix
(2) Jacques Poulain and Anne Larchevesque
(3) Isaac Poulain and Madeline Suet
(4) Isaac Poulain and Jeanne Levesque
(5) Jean Pierre (John Peter) Cazaly & Jeanne (Jane) Poulain (goes to CAZALY tree)
(6) Jaques (James) Cazaly & Elizabeth Eagles
(7) Catherine Walford (Kate) Cazaly & William Little (goes to LITTLE tree)
(8) Fanny Beatrice Little & Frederick Joseph Chapple (goes to CHAPPLE tree)
(9) Mary Beatrice Chapple & Albert Ernest Shade

The Poulain family were Huguenots, escapees from religious persecution in France particularly at the time of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. The history of the hundreds of thousands of Huguenots displaced from Europe is well documented. The area that the Poulain family came from is in Normandy, France, close to Dieppe which has a direct route to Dover, Kent.

On arrival in England as refugees, the Poulain family and other compatriots settled and worshipped in the Walloon or Strangers Church in Canterbury Cathedral in Kent.

After some time they made their way to the Huguenot area of London, particularly at the Threadneedle Street and Saint Jean French Huguenot churches (temples).

My documentation of this family could not have progressed without the help of Penny Cazaly who supplied many insights including the location of the essential data base with French information (see Page Index).


Recent Changes

Addition of seventh generation, and a lot more detail in earlier generations, added 14 Mar 2012

Contact Libby Shade for further details
email:
libbyshade@westnet.com.au
P.O. Box 105, Rosanna 3084, Victoria, Australia

This family tree is provided for mutual information within the family.
The information given will be referenced by official documents, family bibles etc.
Information that is uncertain or unreferenced will not be published.
For privacy of the present generations, the family tree will halt at the generation born around the start of the 20th century.
Discussion gladly entered into.